Even in these modern times, in Delaware and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, agriculture is vital – a way of life we cherish, and an economic driver we need. And our chicken industry is absolutely essential to the region’s farmers, small business owners and everyday families.

Delmarva’s poultry industry both relies upon and supports Delmarva’s grain and poultry farmers. Soybean and grain farmers benefit from a robust local market, while poultry companies benefit from access to local feed ingredients. Raising chickens also allows farmers to diversify their farm income.

Similarly, our local communities both rely upon and support this economic engine, providing labor for jobs that are directly related to the poultry industry and its suppliers, or induced by the industry. Delmarva’s more than 1,700 chicken farms play a big role in helping keep our regional economy strong. And the farmers who raise chicken work hard delivering high quality, wholesome food while doing what’s right for the communities in which they work and live.

In Delaware, the chicken industry accounts for more than 10,000 jobs with total wages of more than $747.5 million. These are good jobs, paying an average of $70,847 in wages and benefits. In Maryland, the poultry industry accounts for more than 15,000 jobs with total wages of more than $971 million. Average wages and benefits in Maryland are $64,699.

In 2016, the poultry industry was responsible for as much as $3.34 billion in total economic activity throughout Delaware and $3.96 billion in Maryland. All told, the industry and its employees paid about $419 million in federal taxes and $199.8 million in state and local taxes in 2016.

“Nearly every business on Delmarva – including small businesses – is positively affected by the chicken industry,” said Bill Satterfield, Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc.’s executive director. “These numbers reinforce just how important the chicken industry is to the region, and they show the industry growing at a calm, sustainable pace.”

Learn more about how chickens are grown

Cluck, cluck!

Are you spending $10,000 or more a year on energy bills for your farm? If so, the Energize Delaware Farm Program can help you reduce energy costs while providing you with incentive money to assist in upgrading to more efficient technologies.

The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility has partnered with EnSave, an agricultural energy efficiency company, to help promote and implement the Energize Delaware Farm Program. Through this partnership, EnSave has been contracted to provide each farmer with a comprehensive energy audit that provides an outline of cost effective energy efficiency measures for your farm. The program provides incentives up to $100,000 and loans up to $400,000 towards the installation of efficiency measures.

What qualifies?
Energy efficiency upgrades include, but are not limited to, energy efficient lighting and HVAC, poultry house insulation, tunnel doors, brood curtains, irrigation pump replacement, variable speed drives, sprinklers, nozzles, fuel switching, etc.

How to Apply?

Step 1 – Submit a completed application to receive an energy audit (application attached)

Step 2 – Review your completed audit and decide which recommendations to implement

Step 3 – Get approval

Step 4 – Install your equipment

Step 5 – Receive incentive money!

An Energize Delaware Farm Program representative will be available to help you through each step of the process, from application through implementation. Call today at (800) 732-1399 to take advantage of this opportunity.
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Delaware Secretary of Agriculture Michael Scuse is reminding farmers to complete the small grain production survey that has been sent out to nearly 300 producers by the USDA’s National Agricultural ...

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Sometimes people ask us about today's farming methods and whether they support #biodiversity. We think so. These pics were all taken on conventional #Maryland #farms over the past week. Hedgerows and ditches and pollinator habitat and forestland all provide places for the wildlife we see here, and much more. (The black snake probably came from the basement, which we are not so thrilled about.)

Eagles, a pileated woodpecker, a walking stick, a wheel bug ... Facebook won't let us post the video of the toads along with photos so you'll just have to trust us that we found one under the farmhouse shutter! 🐸
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Soybeans are usually cracked and then processed into meal and oil components. The oil can be further processed into #biodiesel, and the meal is typically used for feeding poultry and livestock. ... See MoreSee Less

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Queen Anne's County's own Jenny Rhodes was recognized by WBOC TV 16 Delmarva's News Leader in their Honoring Delmarva Farmers segment! Congratulations, Jenny! ... See MoreSee Less

Honoring Delmarva's Farmers: Jenny Rhodes of Queen Anne's County, Maryland is considered the superstar of ag education in Maryland. ---> www.delmarvalife.com/delmarvalife/honoring-delmarvas-far...

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Jenny Rhodes is a chicken farmer superstar. ... See MoreSee Less

Honoring Delmarva's Farmers: Jenny Rhodes of Queen Anne's County, Maryland is considered the superstar of ag education in Maryland. ---> www.delmarvalife.com/delmarvalife/honoring-delmarvas-far...

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Anytime you buy or eat chicken in the United States, you can be assured that the chicken is…

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More help from the chicken community on its way to Texas, as Perdue Farms donates to Feeding America food banks -- and sends emergency meals for pets, too. ... See MoreSee Less

As we're preparing our product donations to ship to Feeding America food banks in flood stricken Texas, we're also loading three trucks with our Spot Farms dehydrated dog food. A shout-out to the food...

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How many crops do you think Maryland farmers grow?
www.mymdfarmers.com #MyMdFarmers #Agriculture
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My Maryland Farmers shared Maryland Soybean Board's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Soybeans are usually cracked and then processed into meal and oil components. The oil can be further processed into #biodiesel, and the meal is typically used for feeding poultry and livestock.

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