Even in these modern times, in Delaware and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, agriculture is vital – a way of life we cherish, and an economic driver we need. And our chicken industry is absolutely essential to the region’s farmers, small business owners and everyday families.

Delmarva’s poultry industry both relies upon and supports Delmarva’s grain and poultry farmers. Soybean and grain farmers benefit from a robust local market, while poultry companies benefit from access to local feed ingredients. Raising chickens also allows farmers to diversify their farm income.

Similarly, our local communities both rely upon and support this economic engine, providing labor for jobs that are directly related to the poultry industry and its suppliers, or induced by the industry. Delmarva’s more than 1,700 chicken farms play a big role in helping keep our regional economy strong. And the farmers who raise chicken work hard delivering high quality, wholesome food while doing what’s right for the communities in which they work and live.

In Delaware, the chicken industry accounts for more than 10,000 jobs with total wages of more than $747.5 million. These are good jobs, paying an average of $70,847 in wages and benefits. In Maryland, the poultry industry accounts for more than 15,000 jobs with total wages of more than $971 million. Average wages and benefits in Maryland are $64,699.

In 2016, the poultry industry was responsible for as much as $3.34 billion in total economic activity throughout Delaware and $3.96 billion in Maryland. All told, the industry and its employees paid about $419 million in federal taxes and $199.8 million in state and local taxes in 2016.

“Nearly every business on Delmarva – including small businesses – is positively affected by the chicken industry,” said Bill Satterfield, Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc.’s executive director. “These numbers reinforce just how important the chicken industry is to the region, and they show the industry growing at a calm, sustainable pace.”

Learn more about how chickens are grown

3 hours ago

Delaware Soybean Board

Eating for a good cause! Taking BBQ orders - eat in or carry out with sale going for ag scholarships.The friends and colleagues of Bill Brown, our former poultry Extension agent whom we lost in 2016, have organized the inaugural Bill Brown Barbecue Chicken Fundraiser which will fund the Bill Brown Scholarship, awarded to a deserving University of Delaware College of Agriculture and Natural Resources student each year in Bill’s memory. On Thursday, August 29, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. we will be preparing an $8 lunch which includes one-quarter chicken, roll, chips and pickle. Patrons may pick up orders for take-out, dine in at our shaded picnic grove, or request free delivery. Deadline to order Tuesday, August 27. Order online: www.udel.edu/006144 ... See MoreSee Less

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... well, at least they’re good listeners...? ... See MoreSee Less

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See the latest crop research at Carvel Research Center this Wednesday, 3:30-5:30pm. Chicken dinner follows. Call 302-856-7303 to RSVP today. #carvelresearch #udextension #soyresearch ... See MoreSee Less

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3 hours ago

Maryland Soybean Board

#MDA wants your lanternflies. Snap a photo, catch and mail. #spottedlanternfly #invasivespeciesWANTED: SPOTTED LANTERNFLY

We are asking all Marylanders to be on the look out for adult spotted lanternflies.👀 When full-grown, these invasive pests are strikingly-colored with grayish spotted front wings and red, white, and black patterned hind wings. The body is yellow/black banded and they are approximately one-inch in size (as shown in the photo). The spotted lanternfly may be small, but it poses a major threat to our region's agriculture industry as they feed on over 70 different types of crops, including grapes, hops, tree fruits, hardwoods, and ornamentals—just to name a few!

Maryland's first spotted lanternfly was confirmed in Cecil County last October, so we ask Cecil County residents and those living along the Maryland-Pennsylvania border to be extra vigilant!

If you see this bug, snap a picture of it, catch it, freeze it in a plastic bag, send it to the Maryland Department of Agriculture, and report it to DontBug.MD@Maryland.gov. For more information on the spotted lanternfly, please visit the department's website: mda.maryland.gov/spottedlanternfly
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5 days ago

Maryland Soybean Board

Twins, who have not learned that escaping danger should not involve crossing a street. Maryland’s deer population causes $180 million in vehicle damage and related costs annually- while costing farmers an additional $60 million in lost revenues due to feeding on crops. While they are “pretty,” they are destructive. #deer @ St. Mary's County, Maryland ... See MoreSee Less

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6 days ago

Maryland Soybean Board

Get your ticket here for next Thursday's field day. #farmtech #4ralliance #farmtourOur 4R Field Day is coming up on August 22! Each week, find out what to expect at #4RFieldDay19. At our last of five stations, you'll hear from 2019 4R Advocate Jonathan Quinn and Southern States Cooperative about how he uses the 4Rs on his farm.

Get your tickets here: www.eventbrite.com/e/4r-technology-field-day-tickets-63009851161
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Taking part the new strategic plan development with @mdagdept today. #brainstorming #rainydaymakesforgoodturnout #meetingsofinstagtram #thecoffeeanddonutsaredelicious ... See MoreSee Less

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Vegetative environmental buffers can be laid low by too much weed trimming. Here, Jim Passwaters walks you through weed-control options on a chicken farm with buffers. ... See MoreSee Less

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Whoo-hoo! A whole bunch of chicken industry workplaces on Delmarva - including Perdue Farms, Allen Harim, Mountaire Farms and Cobb-Vantress, Inc. - just won recognition for their outstanding safety records from a group focused on making plants, hatcheries and feed mills safer. ... See MoreSee Less

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Chicken growers work hard when it's hot, using fans, cool cell pads, sprinkler systems and constant attention to make certain their flocks are cool and comfortable. Here's to the farm families who never hesitate to break a sweat in service of a happy, healthy chicken flock. ... See MoreSee Less

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Friday feeling. bit.ly/1hlTAZu #MyMdFarmers #FridayFeeling ... See MoreSee Less

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4 days ago

My Maryland Farmers

"The next 30 years are the most important in the history of agriculture because we’re about to fight climate change and create the food systems of the future." ... See MoreSee Less

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4 days ago

My Maryland Farmers

As times have changed, so has the focus of Maryland Farmers. Our farmers are proactive and forward looking into what the needs of tomorrow will be. #MyMdFarmers ... See MoreSee Less

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See you at the market! #MyMdFarmers ... See MoreSee Less

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