Even in these modern times, in Delaware and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, agriculture is vital – a way of life we cherish, and an economic driver we need. And our chicken industry is absolutely essential to the region’s farmers, small business owners and everyday families.

Delmarva’s poultry industry both relies upon and supports Delmarva’s grain and poultry farmers. Soybean and grain farmers benefit from a robust local market, while poultry companies benefit from access to local feed ingredients. Raising chickens also allows farmers to diversify their farm income.

Similarly, our local communities both rely upon and support this economic engine, providing labor for jobs that are directly related to the poultry industry and its suppliers, or induced by the industry. Delmarva’s more than 1,700 chicken farms play a big role in helping keep our regional economy strong. And the farmers who raise chicken work hard delivering high quality, wholesome food while doing what’s right for the communities in which they work and live.

In Delaware, the chicken industry accounts for more than 10,000 jobs with total wages of more than $747.5 million. These are good jobs, paying an average of $70,847 in wages and benefits. In Maryland, the poultry industry accounts for more than 15,000 jobs with total wages of more than $971 million. Average wages and benefits in Maryland are $64,699.

In 2016, the poultry industry was responsible for as much as $3.34 billion in total economic activity throughout Delaware and $3.96 billion in Maryland. All told, the industry and its employees paid about $419 million in federal taxes and $199.8 million in state and local taxes in 2016.

“Nearly every business on Delmarva – including small businesses – is positively affected by the chicken industry,” said Bill Satterfield, Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc.’s executive director. “These numbers reinforce just how important the chicken industry is to the region, and they show the industry growing at a calm, sustainable pace.”

Learn more about how chickens are grown

Cluck, cluck!

Who else is runnin' irritation?
(See what we did there?)
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A little #fridayfunny humor from our chairman. 😂 ... See MoreSee Less

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Soybeans are typically broken down into meal and oil, with the soybean meal being a valuable high-protein feed ingredient for broiler (meat) chickens raised on Delmarva. ... See MoreSee Less

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Can't wait to see how these February beans turn out! ... See MoreSee Less

Soybean update of February planted beans. What does June 21 mean to you? Find out what it means to soybeans.

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We visited Eric Spates's farm in #MoCo last week and learned the history of a beautiful #barn on his family's farm.

Eric has agreed to be a featured farmer on our blog this summer, showing consumers how Maryland farmers get the job done.

mymdfarmers.com/ice-cream-cones-soybeans-rain-and-beetles/
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When we tallied up the numbers from our College Scholarship Golf Tournament, we found this year's event raised $14,000 -- not bad for a day's work, right? All that support from the teams and the sponsors will be put to work backing students pursuing careers in the chicken industry. Way to go, everyone! ... See MoreSee Less

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Good times. Tasty chicken! ... See MoreSee Less

DELAWARE SNAPSHOT: Finger-lickin’ good - Competition is fierce at the 10th Annual Delmarva Chicken Festival in Laurel, including in the chicken-eating contest. At right, 13-year-old Billy Womack of ...

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We're totally on board with all the hard work and cooperation that is turning the Chesapeake Bay's water quality measures around, leading to a livelier, healthier bay. Perdue Farms gets it. ... See MoreSee Less

Perdue associates in Salisbury, Md., joined the Oyster Recovery Partnership to fill shells bags that will assist with restoration of the Chesapeake Bay oyster population. More than 2.8 million baby oy...

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Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI) has hired Holly Porter as its assistant executive director.

Mrs. Porter’s responsibilities for the non-profit trade association working for the Delmarva Peninsula’s chicken industry will include membership development and promotion, assisting the Communications Manager on outreach programs, expanding the association’s public affairs work, serving as liaison with other poultry and agricultural associations, working with the Executive Director on event and meeting planning and implementation, and assisting the Executive Director with all aspects of organization management and policy implementation.

“I’m excited to begin working for the common good of the chicken industry,” Mrs. Porter said. “Delmarva’s chicken industry contributes $3.2 billion annually to our economy, and it is absolutely central to the prosperity of farmers, businesses, and families from Accomack County, Virginia to Cecil County, Maryland. DPI plays a key role in keeping us strong and profitable. I intend to help our ranks grow with new members, and will work diligently to keep DPI’s members informed and engaged.”

Executive Director Bill Satterfield noted her outstanding background and enthusiasm as prime factors in her hiring. “We are fortunate to have Holly as part of our team with an eye toward her becoming Executive Director in early 2019,” Mr. Satterfield said. “With her experiences at the largest agricultural lender on Delmarva and her marketing and policy work in Delaware government, she will hit the ground running to provide more services to our industry and our members.”

Mrs. Porter comes to DPI from the Delaware Department of Agriculture, where she was a deputy principal assistant in the Office of the Secretary. Previously, she was a marketing specialist for the Delaware Department of Agriculture and also worked in marketing for MidAtlantic Farm Credit. She has served as the co-director of the LEADelaware program, as a committee member of the MidAtlantic Women in Agriculture Conference and as an advisory council member to the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education program. Mrs. Porter grew up on a grain farm on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and earned a degree from Marymount University. She and her family make their home in Caroline County, Md.
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Fun Fact: June is #NationalDairyMonth – Maryland's third largest agriculture commodity. Support your local dairy farm and stock up on your favorite products! bit.ly/2sB1jw1 #FarmFriday #BuyLocal Maryland's Best ... See MoreSee Less

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Long #summer days are for making #hay. Check out the round baler in action at Eric Spate's Stoney Castle Farm in Poolesville, Md. Read more on our blog: mymdfarmers.com/ice-cream-cones-soybeans-rain-and-beetles/ ... See MoreSee Less

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