Even in these modern times, in Delaware and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, agriculture is vital – a way of life we cherish, and an economic driver we need. And our chicken industry is absolutely essential to the region’s farmers, small business owners and everyday families.

Delmarva’s poultry industry both relies upon and supports Delmarva’s grain and poultry farmers. Soybean and grain farmers benefit from a robust local market, while poultry companies benefit from access to local feed ingredients. Raising chickens also allows farmers to diversify their farm income.

Similarly, our local communities both rely upon and support this economic engine, providing labor for jobs that are directly related to the poultry industry and its suppliers, or induced by the industry. Delmarva’s more than 1,700 chicken farms play a big role in helping keep our regional economy strong. And the farmers who raise chicken work hard delivering high quality, wholesome food while doing what’s right for the communities in which they work and live.

In Delaware, the chicken industry accounts for more than 10,000 jobs with total wages of more than $747.5 million. These are good jobs, paying an average of $70,847 in wages and benefits. In Maryland, the poultry industry accounts for more than 15,000 jobs with total wages of more than $971 million. Average wages and benefits in Maryland are $64,699.

In 2016, the poultry industry was responsible for as much as $3.34 billion in total economic activity throughout Delaware and $3.96 billion in Maryland. All told, the industry and its employees paid about $419 million in federal taxes and $199.8 million in state and local taxes in 2016.

“Nearly every business on Delmarva – including small businesses – is positively affected by the chicken industry,” said Bill Satterfield, Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc.’s executive director. “These numbers reinforce just how important the chicken industry is to the region, and they show the industry growing at a calm, sustainable pace.”

Learn more about how chickens are grown

Cluck, cluck!

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Whole Farm Revenue Protection (WRFP) is an emerging insurance product now available through all crop insurance agencies on Delmarva and throughout the U.S. WFRP covers revenue from a host of crops and enterprises not otherwise insurable. In addition, for crops currently insurable by the familiar Yield Protection (YP) and Revenue Protection (RP), WFRP may provide more actual income protection at a reduced premium cost.

On August 22, 2017, 9:00-12:00, a workshop will be held at the Carvel Center, Georgetown, DE, which will include an introduction to WFRP. Every farm family should have someone in attendance to get an overview of how the Whole Farm coverage concept works.
WFRP has gained considerable acceptance some areas of the country. Ben Thiel, Director of the RMA Northwest Region, will report on what producers in his area find attractive about WFRP. Delmarva producers can compare the potential opportunities for their own operations.

The agenda features remarks by DDA Secretary Michael Scuse, former USDA undersecretary whose mission area included the Risk Management Agency (RMA) which develops and oversees federal crop insurance. Secretary Scuse will provide his perspective on emerging crop and revenue coverage trends and what Congress might be expected to do in the next Farm Bill.

Deputy Secretary Kenny Bounds will report on his first six months on the job, as well as his experience in his former career in ag lending, specifically regarding the importance of risk management on the part of a borrower.

Delaware farmer and risk management program facilitator Don Clifton will present a WRFP overview with examples of Delmarva specific applications and case studies.

Dr. Jarrod Miller, University of Maryland Extension Ag Educator will discuss soil health and the nutrient management aspects of cover crops, which is a very timely subject.

Every farm family should have at least one person in attendance for this workshop!

For further details: Contact Laurie Wolinski at 302-831-2538 or LGW@udel.edu to register. You may also call Don Clifton at 302-242-8806 with questions or email questions to decrophelp@gmail.com.
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www.mymdfarmers.com
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