Even in these modern times, in Delaware and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, agriculture is vital – a way of life we cherish, and an economic driver we need. And our chicken industry is absolutely essential to the region’s farmers, small business owners and everyday families.
Delmarva’s poultry industry both relies upon and supports Delmarva’s grain and poultry farmers. Soybean and grain farmers benefit from a robust local market, while poultry companies benefit from access to local feed ingredients. Raising chickens also allows farmers to diversify their farm income.
Similarly, our local communities both rely upon and support this economic engine, providing labor for jobs that are directly related to the poultry industry and its suppliers, or induced by the industry. Delmarva’s more than 1,700 chicken farms play a big role in helping keep our regional economy strong. And the farmers who raise chicken work hard delivering high quality, wholesome food while doing what’s right for the communities in which they work and live.

In Delaware, the chicken industry accounts for more than 10,000 jobs with total wages of more than $747.5 million. These are good jobs, paying an average of $70,847 in wages and benefits. In Maryland, the poultry industry accounts for more than 15,000 jobs with total wages of more than $971 million. Average wages and benefits in Maryland are $64,699.

In 2016, the poultry industry was responsible for as much as $3.34 billion in total economic activity throughout Delaware and $3.96 billion in Maryland. All told, the industry and its employees paid about $419 million in federal taxes and $199.8 million in state and local taxes in 2016.

“Nearly every business on Delmarva – including small businesses – is positively affected by the chicken industry,” said Bill Satterfield, Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc.’s executive director. “These numbers reinforce just how important the chicken industry is to the region, and they show the industry growing at a calm, sustainable pace.”

Learn more about how chickens are grown

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My Maryland Farmers

My Maryland Farmers

Meet the farmers growing the highest quality food, feed and fiber products for their families and yo

Let’s join together for a moment to give thanks. Because what on earth would we do without our spectacular, hard working farmers. You mean so much to us. #thankful #MyMDFarmers

Let’s join together for a moment to give thanks. Because what on earth would we do without our spectacular, hard working farmers. You mean so much to us. #thankful #MyMDFarmers ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

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Happy Thanksgiving and thank you for all you do, be blessed and safe..

Happy Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving

Yes indeed!!!

Happy Turkey Day to you and everyone. Please do not text or drink while driving. I want everyone to get home safe.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING AND THANKFUL FOR ALL YOU DO TO PROVIDE FOOD FOR OUR TABLES.

Same to you

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Maryland Soybean Board

Maryland Soybean Board

The Maryland Soybean Board is a nonprofit dedicated to maximizing the profitability of Maryland soyb

Today we are thankful for Maryland’s farm families who provide bountiful harvests for us to enjoy 🍽️

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1 day ago
A common question asked by farmers dealing with herbicide resistant Palmer amaranth is, “What are the most effective burndown options in situations where Palmer amaranth is larger then the ideal 3-4 inch control range?” This scenario is often encountered in fields left fallow for a year, fields with delayed planting due to saturated soils, and double crop fields following wheat. 

In the summer of 2022, Ben Beale, Principal Agriculture Agent, and Alan Leslie, Agriculture Agent, of University of Maryland Extension   undertook a study evaluating eight different treatments for control of larger Palmer amaranth in Southern Maryland. Find results here: https://bit.ly/3OqW4X0

A common question asked by farmers dealing with herbicide resistant Palmer amaranth is, “What are the most effective burndown options in situations where Palmer amaranth is larger then the ideal 3-4 inch control range?” This scenario is often encountered in fields left fallow for a year, fields with delayed planting due to saturated soils, and double crop fields following wheat.

In the summer of 2022, Ben Beale, Principal Agriculture Agent, and Alan Leslie, Agriculture Agent, of University of Maryland Extension undertook a study evaluating eight different treatments for control of larger Palmer amaranth in Southern Maryland. Find results here: bit.ly/3OqW4X0
... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago