Even in these modern times, in Delaware and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, agriculture is vital – a way of life we cherish, and an economic driver we need. And our chicken industry is absolutely essential to the region’s farmers, small business owners and everyday families.

Delmarva’s poultry industry both relies upon and supports Delmarva’s grain and poultry farmers. Soybean and grain farmers benefit from a robust local market, while poultry companies benefit from access to local feed ingredients. Raising chickens also allows farmers to diversify their farm income.

Similarly, our local communities both rely upon and support this economic engine, providing labor for jobs that are directly related to the poultry industry and its suppliers, or induced by the industry. Delmarva’s more than 1,700 chicken farms play a big role in helping keep our regional economy strong. And the farmers who raise chicken work hard delivering high quality, wholesome food while doing what’s right for the communities in which they work and live.

In Delaware, the chicken industry accounts for more than 10,000 jobs with total wages of more than $747.5 million. These are good jobs, paying an average of $70,847 in wages and benefits. In Maryland, the poultry industry accounts for more than 15,000 jobs with total wages of more than $971 million. Average wages and benefits in Maryland are $64,699.

In 2016, the poultry industry was responsible for as much as $3.34 billion in total economic activity throughout Delaware and $3.96 billion in Maryland. All told, the industry and its employees paid about $419 million in federal taxes and $199.8 million in state and local taxes in 2016.

“Nearly every business on Delmarva – including small businesses – is positively affected by the chicken industry,” said Bill Satterfield, Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc.’s executive director. “These numbers reinforce just how important the chicken industry is to the region, and they show the industry growing at a calm, sustainable pace.”

Learn more about how chickens are grown

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Join the Delaware Soil Health Partnership, Sussex Conservation District and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service for their Caffeine and Cover Crops event January 18! This event is free and preregistration is required to attend virtually or in-person: bit.ly/3qhyPmn ... See MoreSee Less

Join the Delaware Soil Health Partnership, Sussex Conservation District and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service for their Caffeine and Cover Crops event January 18! This event is free and preregistration is required to attend virtually or in-person: https://bit.ly/3qhyPmn

Are you interested in the Delaware Ag Week virtual sessions? Join the Delaware Department of Agriculture for various viewing sessions at the Georgetown Public Library.

Register: deagweekviewing.eventbrite.com
... See MoreSee Less

Are you interested in the Delaware Ag Week virtual sessions? Join the Delaware Department of Agriculture for various viewing sessions at the Georgetown Public Library. 
Register: https://deagweekviewing.eventbrite.com

Join Delaware Ag Month for their hybrid Soybeans and Small Grain Session on January 13! There will be opportunities to earn pest management, nutrient management, and CCA credits.

Learn More and Register: sites.udel.edu/delawareagweek/
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Join Delaware Ag Month for their hybrid Soybeans and Small Grain Session on January 13! There will be opportunities to earn pest management, nutrient management, and CCA credits.
Learn More and Register: https://sites.udel.edu/delawareagweek/

Merry Christmas Eve! Wishing you and your loved ones a joyous holiday season. ... See MoreSee Less

Merry Christmas Eve! Wishing you and your loved ones a joyous holiday season.

The last soybean marketing year, which ended in September, smashed soybean export volume records. Prices moved past $16/bushel. Markets expanded. More customers bought our beans. What does that mean for YOU in the coming season? Take a look: bit.ly/3yJ4aCg ... See MoreSee Less

The last soybean marketing year, which ended in September, smashed soybean export volume records. Prices moved past $16/bushel. Markets expanded. More customers bought our beans. What does that mean for YOU in the coming season? Take a look: https://bit.ly/3yJ4aCg
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Timeline photosIf you’re driving and you notice a vehicle with a fluorescent orange triangle with a reflective red border, you should respond with caution. A slow-moving vehicle sign (SMV) warns other drivers if a car is moving at 25 mph or less. findmedriving.com/ #FindMeDriving #RoadSafety ... See MoreSee Less

Beginning today, farmers can signup for the Maryland Department of Agriculture's Conservation Buffer Initiative. Now in its second year, this popular conservation program offers attractive incentives, easy signup, and more management options for farmers who want to plant streamside buffers on their farms to improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.

Learn More: bit.ly/3JUrm62
... See MoreSee Less

Beginning today, farmers can signup for the Maryland Department of Agricultures Conservation Buffer Initiative. Now in its second year, this popular conservation program offers attractive incentives, easy signup, and more management options for farmers who want to plant streamside buffers on their farms to improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. 
Learn More: https://bit.ly/3JUrm62

Timeline photosIf you live in a rural area or often commute through agricultural areas, here are a few tips to help you share the road with slow moving vehicles, slow moving farm equipment vehicles, and horse-drawn carriages: bit.ly/32rT3SF #FindMeDriving #RoadSafety ... See MoreSee Less

Timeline photosMaryland farmers are committed to producing our country's food, feed and fiber supply in a sustainable way. Learn more: www.mymdfarmers.com
Maryland Soybean Board #MyMdFarmers
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The Maryland Soybean Board congratulates farmer Belinda Burrier of Union Bridge, MD after she was reelected to the United Soybean Board (USB) Executive Committee last month. This year, 2022, will mark Burrier’s eighth year serving as Maryland’s representative to the United Soybean Board, and her third year serving on their Executive Committee. This year, she will serve in the new position of Communications and Education Chairman under the USB’s recently adopted strategic plan update.

Read More: bit.ly/3EWf89h
... See MoreSee Less

The Maryland Soybean Board congratulates farmer Belinda Burrier of Union Bridge, MD after she was reelected to the United Soybean Board (USB) Executive Committee last month. This year, 2022, will mark Burrier’s eighth year serving as Maryland’s representative to the United Soybean Board, and her third year serving on their Executive Committee. This year, she will serve in the new position of Communications and Education Chairman under the USB’s recently adopted strategic plan update.
Read More: https://bit.ly/3EWf89h

Comment on Facebook

Great person for the job. Congrats Belinda

Congratulations! & Thank you!

👏👏

Congratulations

Congrats Belinda!

Outstanding 😎

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20 hours ago

My Maryland Farmers

For farmers, sustainability comes second nature—it's just what they do. All farmers share the same goal of taking care of their land and natural resources. bit.ly/3fiegkV #MyMdFarmers #sustainability ... See MoreSee Less

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I love farmers ❤️

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Did you know that pallets move the world, and they are being produced here in #Maryland? Meet Don Beazley, Owner of Polo Pallet and Mill Creek Lumber in Cecil County, MD.

When you’re picking up something you need from the center aisle of your local store, the pallet that sits beneath it is an afterthought. However, as Don Beazley knows, “pallets move the world.”

For 15 years, his 12,000sqft facility in Elkton has turned logs
into a forestry product that provides the foundation for how goods are moved across this country and the world, from port to truck to warehouse to store. Whether made of mixed hardwoods or yellow pine, pallets offer a resting place for all our consumer products and make for easy transportation of a long line of goods.

Polo pallets are designed by Beazley’s daughter, Julianna, using software created by Virginia Tech professor Mark White. Beazley has also partnered with VT to explore an innovative, environmentally friendly alternative to methyl bromide.

To learn more about Don and his operation, use the link below:

www.mdforests.org/post/did-you-know-that-pallets-move-the-world-and-they-are-being-produced-in-he...

#FacesofForestry #marylandforests #forestsforever #forestproud #forestry #pallets #sawmill #cecilcountymd #woodproducts

Photo Credit: Edwin Remsberg
Project Support: Rural Maryland Council

Upper Shore Regional Council
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Comment on Facebook

Great news! Made in USA, hooray!!!!

Hauled many a truck load of those things.

The cantwell & cleary co make boxes in Landover MD another forestry product and every one needs boxes

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How do crabs get around on land?
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Answer: They use the sidewalk!
bit.ly/3nnkYdL #MyMdFarmers #FarmFriday #MarylandCrab
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How do crabs get around on land? 
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Answer: They use the sidewalk!
https://bit.ly/3nnkYdL #MyMdFarmers #FarmFriday #MarylandCrab

Comment on Facebook

Just got it!

Ed Young !

I never new them swam. I always thought they crawled

Beautiful specimen!

Walk

👍🦀👍 🍺

I don't know but I'll ask Bernie!

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In addition to benefits for future crops, cover crops can provide winter food, cover, and nesting sites for birds and other wildlife, as well as forage opportunities for livestock producers. Learn more: bit.ly/3GvSOET #MyMdFarmers #covercrops #sustainablefarming ... See MoreSee Less

In addition to benefits for future crops, cover crops can provide winter food, cover, and nesting sites for birds and other wildlife, as well as forage opportunities for livestock producers. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3GvSOET #MyMdFarmers #CoverCrops #SustainableFarming